pritheworld:

Half a century after the assassination of JFK, what do young people outside of America know about our 35th president?

# JFK # John F. Kennedy # cosat # schoolyear # south africa # Cape Town # education

reblogged from PRI's The World
pritheworld:

Tandie Nsoki is a senior at the Centre of Science and Technology (COSAT) in the South African township of Khayelitsha.
Tandie shares a bedroom with her mother, while her two younger brothers sleep in the kitchen. Tandie has a small homework table set up by her bed, and spends many afternoons and evenings studying there.

pritheworld:

Tandie Nsoki is a senior at the Centre of Science and Technology (COSAT) in the South African township of Khayelitsha.

Tandie shares a bedroom with her mother, while her two younger brothers sleep in the kitchen. Tandie has a small homework table set up by her bed, and spends many afternoons and evenings studying there.

# south africa # PRI's The World # COSAT # SchoolYear # education

reblogged from PRI's The World
What if an academic test that you took at the age of 11 determined your life’s course?When David Ward was 11 years old, he took a state exam introduced by the British government — it was called Eleven Plus. If he passed the exam, Ward would be among the chosen few, plucked from the working classes to be enrolled in an elite government-run school—and likely college after that. (Photo: David Ward by Patrick Cox, PRI’s The World)Ward and three others in his class of sixty passed the exam. They had earned themselves places in what in Britain are called grammar schools. But Lesley Ebbetts did not pass the exam. She was sent to a school categorized as Secondary Moderns, which quickly became viewed as places where ungifted children ended up, where they were housed until they were old enough to go to work.Where Ward and Ebbetts ended up later on in life is a bit of a surprise, but more surprising is how the British government is bringing back its 1960s social experiment. More.

What if an academic test that you took at the age of 11 determined your life’s course?

When David Ward was 11 years old, he took a state exam introduced by the British government — it was called Eleven Plus. If he passed the exam, Ward would be among the chosen few, plucked from the working classes to be enrolled in an elite government-run school—and likely college after that. (Photo: David Ward by Patrick Cox, PRI’s The World)

Ward and three others in his class of sixty passed the exam. They had earned themselves places in what in Britain are called grammar schools. But Lesley Ebbetts did not pass the exam. She was sent to a school categorized as Secondary Moderns, which quickly became viewed as places where ungifted children ended up, where they were housed until they were old enough to go to work.

Where Ward and Ebbetts ended up later on in life is a bit of a surprise, but more surprising is how the British government is bringing back its 1960s social experiment. More.

# education # class # society # The World # UK

wnyc:

The MIT of Israel: A Look at Cornell’s Partner on the Roosevelt Island Tech CampusCornell University won a bid to build a $2 billion graduate school in New York City earlier this year – but it didn’t do it alone. The Ivy League school partnered with an Israeli-based public research university — the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, sometimes called the MIT of Israel… Read More

wnyc:

The MIT of Israel: A Look at Cornell’s Partner on the Roosevelt Island Tech Campus
Cornell University won a bid to build a $2 billion graduate school in New York City earlier this year – but it didn’t do it alone. The Ivy League school partnered with an Israeli-based public research university — the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, sometimes called the MIT of Israel… Read More

# education # technology # New York

reblogged from WNYC's Transmitter
An image from “The Book of Perfectly Perilous Math: 24 Death-Defying Challenges for Young Mathematicians” by Sean Connolly.
Connolly is attempting the seemingly impossible — in his new book, he tries to make math fun for kids — with zombies, vampires and pizza.
For instance: How long it would take one vampire to take over a town of 500,000 people, if the vampire bites 2 people a month? (Hint: those two people are then vampires the next month and can bite two more innocent victims each!)
More.

An image from “The Book of Perfectly Perilous Math: 24 Death-Defying Challenges for Young Mathematicians” by Sean Connolly.

Connolly is attempting the seemingly impossible — in his new book, he tries to make math fun for kids — with zombies, vampires and pizza.

For instance: How long it would take one vampire to take over a town of 500,000 people, if the vampire bites 2 people a month? (Hint: those two people are then vampires the next month and can bite two more innocent victims each!)

More.

# books # math # education

“I thought it was a joke, until I got Urkeled,” said a Westside Middle School student.
Boys who wear their pants down too low at the Westside Middle School in Memphis get “Urkelized” — or, when teachers or school staff use zip ties to pull up and tighten the waistline of boys’ pants.

“They can put your pants as high as your chest, and they can put as many as three or four [zip ties] on you,” the student told the website KSL.com. “Students know to strap up or get strapped up around here.”
Principal Bobby White of Westside Middle School says his approach is to talk to the young man first and try to convince him to hike up his pants. Then the school calls the child’s parents.
If that fails, zip ties are used to tighten the pant’s waistline. More.

“I thought it was a joke, until I got Urkeled,” said a Westside Middle School student.

Boys who wear their pants down too low at the Westside Middle School in Memphis get “Urkelized” — or, when teachers or school staff use zip ties to pull up and tighten the waistline of boys’ pants.

“They can put your pants as high as your chest, and they can put as many as three or four [zip ties] on you,” the student told the website KSL.com. “Students know to strap up or get strapped up around here.”

Principal Bobby White of Westside Middle School says his approach is to talk to the young man first and try to convince him to hike up his pants. Then the school calls the child’s parents.

If that fails, zip ties are used to tighten the pant’s waistline. More.

# education # schools # fashion

PRI just released our first Multi-Touch book for the iPad! 
Reviving the Image of TeachersThe book, “Studio 360 Teacher Redesign,” offers a multimedia exploration of a creative initiative to rebrand teachers. Text, photos, audio, video and interactive graphics tell the story of how one teacher’s request to revive the stale image of her profession led to a whole new way to look at and think about the role of educators. More.

You can download the book for free from iBookstore.

PRI just released our first Multi-Touch book for the iPad! 

Reviving the Image of Teachers
The book, “Studio 360 Teacher Redesign,” offers a multimedia exploration of a creative initiative to rebrand teachers. Text, photos, audio, video and interactive graphics tell the story of how one teacher’s request to revive the stale image of her profession led to a whole new way to look at and think about the role of educators. More.

PRI Multi-Touch book

You can download the book for free from iBookstore.

(Source: pri.org)

# books # technology # iPad # iBookStore # teachers # education # design

good:

Women Make Less Than Men at Every Education Level
Among Americans with some form of post-high school education—a vocational, associate’s, bachelor’s, or advanced degree—men make more than $800 above women’s pay every month. And the gap widens as men and women climb educational ranks. In short, education is valuable, but it’s most lucrative if you’re male.
Read about it on GOOD→ 

The good news: many women are seeking higher levels of education. The bad news: they will make the same amount of money as their male peers who have less education.

good:

Women Make Less Than Men at Every Education Level

Among Americans with some form of post-high school education—a vocational, associate’s, bachelor’s, or advanced degree—men make more than $800 above women’s pay every month. And the gap widens as men and women climb educational ranks. In short, education is valuable, but it’s most lucrative if you’re male.

Read about it on GOOD→ 

The good news: many women are seeking higher levels of education. The bad news: they will make the same amount of money as their male peers who have less education.

# education # women # salaries # jobs # finance

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